OpenAI Five intro

The text of my speech introducing OpenAI Five at yesterday’s Benchmark event:

“We’re here to watch humans and AI play Dota, but today’s match will have implications for the world. OpenAI’s mission is to ensure that when we can build machines as smart as humans, they will benefit all of humanity. That means both pushing the limits of what’s possible and ensuring future systems are safe and aligned with human values.

We work on Dota because it is a great training ground for AI: it is one of the most complicated games, involving teamwork, real time strategy, imperfect information, and an astronomical combinations of heroes and items.

We can’t program a solution, so Five learns by playing 180 years of games against itself every day — sadly that means we can’t learn from the players up here unless they played for a few decades. It’s powered by 5 artificial neural networks which act like an artificial intuition. Five’s neural networks are about the size of the brain of an ant — still far from what we all have in our heads.

One year ago, we beat the world’s top professionals at 1v1 Dota. People thought 5v5 would be totally out of reach. 1v1 requires mechanics and positioning; people did not expect the same system to learn strategy. But our AI system can learn problems it was not even designed to solve — we just used the same technology to learn to control a robotic hand — something no one could program.

The computational power for OpenAI Five would have been impractical two years ago. But the availability of computation for AI has been increasing exponentially, doubling every 3.5 months since 2012, and one day technologies like this will become commonplace.

Feel free to root for either team. Either way, humanity wins.”


I’m very excited to see where the upcoming months of OpenAI Five development and testing take us.

 
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